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published in baltimore, which was a bigger slave trading town. they both wrote articles about different slave traders. one thing that this man was obese and had sold off children in broken families. actually, both of them. that is what they wrote about. in both cases, the slave traders waylaid them after their articles were printed, they beat the heck out of them, and then one lundy filed charges in this case, the judge said, well, you deserve it, and dismissed the case. in the garrison case, after beating there is not, the slave trader also charged him with libel. garrison was about to go on trial in baltimore in 1833. and he knew that he was not going to get a fair trial. so he skipped town and left in 1833. he went back to boston, and that's when he founded the liberator, which became the great antislavery publication in the united states. lundy had to leave town as well. he was charged in 1833 -- he wrote an article that was well-known in washington at the time. a black woman was walk across the bridge of the potomac and the constable started chasing her. and people in washington kn
about specific7o traitors. originally, there was publishing in baltimore, which was a big slave trading town. they had articles about slave traders, one thing that this man was a guy who broke up families and sold off children -- that is what they wrote about. in both cases, the slave traders waylaid them after their article appeared, they beat the heck out of them and then when charges were filed in his case, the judge says he deserved it and dismissed the charges in the case. anderson's case, after beating garrison outcome of the slave trader also charged him with slander and libel. garrison was about to go on trial in baltimore in 1833 and knew that he was not going to get a fair trial, so he skipped town. he left and went back to boston and that's when he found the great anti-slavery publication in the united states. then he wrote an article about a story that was well-known in washington at the time. a black woman was walking across the bridge over the potomac and a constable started chasing her. the constable supplemented income by selling bikes into slavery for the woman ran away
. lundy started doing it, and he taught garrison to do fit. originally, they were publishing in baltimore which was a bigger slave-trading town, so they both wrote articles about different slave trader, one saying this man was a beast because he had sold off children, he had broke] up families -- actually, both of them. that's what they wrote about. and in both cases the slave traders waylaid them after their articles had appeared, beat the hell out of them. and when lundy filed chargings in his case, the judge said, well, you deserved it and dismissed the charges, dismissed the case. in garrison's case, after beating garrison up, the slave trader also charged him with libel. so garrison was about to go on trial in baltimore in 1833 and was, knew that he was not going to get a fair trial, so he skipped town. so he left in 1833, and he went back to boston. and that's when he founded the liberator. and lundy had to leave town as well. key charged him in 1833 with -- lundy wrote an article about, a story that was well known in washington at the time which was black woman was walking across t
. arisen with were publishing in baltimore which was a bigger slave trading town. they both wrote articles about difference led traders temecula, both of them. that is what they wrote about. beat they supplemented there and kim by kidnapping free blacks and selling them into slavery. the woman ran away. two bella the potomac and drowned. so he wrote an article. here's what happened. here's the name of the constable. district attorney is in, to do something about it. congress should. he hit the roof. when on and charged him and his printer, another white man who helped him run of the copies. electronic drive. the anti slavery people up. one to get rid of the antislavery forces. he was facing $1,000 fine. $20,000 to $100,000. so collected one meal from his friends and took off and went to philadelphia. that was key. >> mainstream press. to bring this whole thing. >> there were a lot of papers of the time. three daily newspapers. three different tendencies. now part of washington d.c. the 11 newspapers. there were aligned with political factions in the government. so they would talk about --
and up the baltimore/washington parkway called the national security agency where he had a long and illustrious career, and i've already alluded a bit to that as well. i've always considered general hayden an intelligence officer who wore a military uniform which i think is important in understanding his character and insight and why i think he's made an important impact on the intelligence discussion. he'll lead off with certain topics that we fed them earlier on to stimulate their thoughts on reflecting on their career, and then we'll follow with mr. woolsey and mr. goss. general hayden? [applause] .. but, that linkage between the intelligence person and the executive and then i will spend most of my time on that. but then i would like to talk a little bit about the relationship with congress. since we have a former member here in porter, i think he can illuminate far better than i. let me start with the relationship between the intelligence person and the decisionmaker. all right? the examples i will kind of use is the intelligence person at the national level and the decisio
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5

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